The Building Evolution Revolution

Niche1

Buildings used to be large, dumb constructions of concrete and steel designed with a specific utility in mind – usually to cram as many people as possible into the smallest possible space without sacrificing safety and productivity. Times have changed with a realisation that great buildings can be self sufficient, operating independently of electricity grids and other infrastructure, and incredibly comfortable.

 

Apple’s new campus, being built in Cupertino, is being constructed with their characteristic attention to detail. While choices about exactly what timber is to be used – all of the interior wood is to be harvested from a specific species of maple, and only finer quality ‘heartwood’ at the centre of the trees will be used – the 1600 metre round building that’s been dubbed “the spaceship”, will have its entire roof covered with solar panels and be designed so that it will be able to operate without air-conditioning 70% of the time.

 

Closer to home, the new Royal Adelaide Hospital will not only be one of the most expensive buildings ever constructed but it will also be one of the most advanced.

 

The 11 storey edifice, which will be finished during 2016, will be one of the country’s greenest and most technologically advanced hospitals, with a purpose-designed ICT engine that integrates patient records, and clinical, patient and facilities management support systems.

 

Read more: The Building Evolution Revolution

Crystal Hall - Australian Museum

Rachel Neeson said the Crystal Hall needed to meet a range of project objectives required by the Australian Museum.

 

Architecturally, it should provide maximum transparency (recasting the Museum as an open living room); respect the historic fabric of the Museum; provide an additional new 120 square metre outdoor ‘hall’; allow flexible use now and for the future – reception by day, new function centre for Sydney by night; be environmentally intelligent; have capacity for display and projection; and, provide continuity of the William Street curtilage as a landscaped whole.

 

Functionally, it should: be equally accessible to all; re-orient the building back to William Street; and accommodate visitors queuing comfortably and safely within the AM site.

 

Internally, it should improve the use of spaces within the existing Museum, including significantly enhancing internal circulation, and allow the reinstatement of the old College Street entrance as a part of 630 square metre gallery.

 

For more downloand pdf file.

Crystal Hall Wins Major Public Architecture Award

The Australian Museum’s (AM) new Crystal Hall entrance has been recognised for its simple and elegant combination of glass, steel and colour, taking home the Award for Public Architecture at this year’s NSW Architecture Awards.

 

The Neeson Murcutt and Joseph Grech designed carbon-neutral entrance features a bespoke crystalline curtain and zig-zagging glass pleats that take full advantage of the AM’s north facing façade. The design casts a glimmering display of refracted light against the AM building at different times throughout the day.

 

For more download pdf file.

 

 

 

SMARTIE Goals – Your First Step on the Path to Success

Variety is the spice of life, or so it’s said, and to ensure that we offer variety, I’m going to write about another methodology that can be utilised for goal setting.  Setting goals is one of the first steps on the path to success.  When you can create a vision of what you are setting out to achieve, and be clear of the steps needed to get there, understand what skills will be needed and what the risks are so they can be mitigated, then the chances of hitting that goal sooner are far higher than if you just set out in a general direction and fly by the seat of your pants and hope it all goes well.  In this article I’m going to describe the elements involved in using the SMARTIE Goal method.

Read more: SMARTIE Goals – Your First Step on the Path to Success